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Long-term excess risk of heart failure in people with type 1 diabetes: a prospective case-control study.

Overview of attention for article published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, September 2015
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34

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
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29 tweeters

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
Title
Long-term excess risk of heart failure in people with type 1 diabetes: a prospective case-control study.
Published in
The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, September 2015
DOI 10.1016/s2213-8587(15)00292-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosengren, Annika, Vestberg, Daniel, Svensson, Ann-Marie, Kosiborod, Mikhail, Clements, Mark, Rawshani, Araz, Pivodic, Aldina, Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia, Lind, Marcus

Abstract

Diabetes is an established risk factor for heart failure, but because nearly all heart failure occurs in older individuals, the excess risk and risk factors for heart failure in individuals with type 1 diabetes are not known. We aimed to determine the excess risk of heart failure in individuals with type 1 diabetes overall and by different levels of glycaemic control and albuminuria. In this prospective case-control study, we identified all individuals with type 1 diabetes registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Registry between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2011, and five controls randomly selected from the general population for each patient, matched according to age, sex, and county, and compared them with respect to subsequent hospital admissions for heart failure, with hazard ratios calculated with Cox regression. In a cohort of 33 402 patients (mean age at baseline 35 years [SD 14], 15 058 [45%] women, and mean duration of diabetes 20·1 years [SD 14·5]), over a mean follow-up of 7·9 years, 1062 (3%) patients were admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of heart failure, compared with 1325 (1%) of 166 228 matched controls over 8·3 years, giving a HR 4·69 (95% CI 3·64-6·04), after adjustment for time-updated age, sex, time-updated diabetes duration, birth in Sweden, educational level, and baseline comorbidities. Worse glycaemic control was associated with increased risk of heart failure in a graded fashion, and so was the presence of albuminuria. Risk of heart failure was also increased among those with well controlled diabetes (adjusted HR 2·16 [95% CI 1·55-3·01]) and in those with no albuminuria (3·38 [2·51-4·57]), but not in the subgroup both well-controlled and with normoalbuminuria (1·59 [0·70-3·58]). Individuals with type 1 diabetes had a four-times increase in the risk of being admitted to hospital with heart failure compared with population-based controls. Poor glycaemic control and impaired renal function substantially increased the risk of heart failure. The Swedish state, Swedish Society for Physicians, the Health & Medical Care Committee of the Regional Executive Board (Region Vastra Gotaland, Sweden), the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation, Diabetes Wellness, Novo Nordisk Foundation (PI M Lind), the Swedish Research Council, and the Swedish Council for working life and social research (Epilife).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 38%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 23%
Student > Master 2 15%
Professor 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 69%
Psychology 3 23%
Unspecified 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2015.
All research outputs
#228,779
of 7,622,744 outputs
Outputs from The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology
#170
of 785 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,848
of 232,736 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology
#13
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,622,744 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 785 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 44.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,736 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.