↓ Skip to main content

Hepatic Arterial Infusion of Low-Density Lipoprotein Docosahexaenoic Acid Nanoparticles Selectively Disrupts Redox Balance in Hepatoma Cells and Reduces Growth of Orthotopic Liver Tumors in Rats

Overview of attention for article published in Gastroenterology, February 2016
Altmetric Badge
100

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Hepatic Arterial Infusion of Low-Density Lipoprotein Docosahexaenoic Acid Nanoparticles Selectively Disrupts Redox Balance in Hepatoma Cells and Reduces Growth of Orthotopic Liver Tumors in Rats
Published in
Gastroenterology, February 2016
DOI 10.1053/j.gastro.2015.10.008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaodong Wen, Lacy Reynolds, Rohit S. Mulik, Soo Young Kim, Tim Van Treuren, Liem H. Nguyen, Hao Zhu, Ian R. Corbin

Abstract

Dietary intake of the natural omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has been implicated in protecting patients with viral hepatitis B or C from developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Little is known about the effects of DHA on established solid tumors. Herein, we describe a low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-based nanoparticle that acts as a transporter for unesterified DHA (LDL-DHA) and demonstrates selective cytotoxicity towards HCC cells. We investigated the ability of LDL-DHA to reduce growth of orthotopic hepatomas in rats. ACI rats were given intrahepatic injections of rat hepatoma cells (H4IIE); 24 tumor-bearing rats (mean tumor diameter, ∼1 cm) were subject to a single hepatic artery injection of LDL nanoparticles (2 mg/kg) loaded with DHA (LDL-DHA), triolein (LDL-TO) or sham surgery controls. Tumor growth was measured by magnetic resonance imaging and other methods; tumor, liver and serum samples were collected and assessed by histochemical, immunofluorescence, biochemical and immunoblot analyses. Three days after administration of LDL-TO or sham surgery, the control rats had large, highly vascularized tumors that contained proliferating cells. However, rats given LDL-DHA had smaller, pale tumors that were devoid of vascular supply and greater than 80% of the tumor tissue was necrotic. Four to 6 days after injection of LDL-DHA, the tumors were 3-fold smaller than those of control rats. The liver tissue that surrounded the tumors showed no histologic or biochemical evidence of injury. Injection of LDL-DHA into the hepatic artery of rats selectively deregulated redox reactions in tumor tissues by: increasing levels of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, depleting and oxidizing glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, and significantly downregulating the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase-4. Remarkably, the redox balance in the surrounding liver was not disrupted. LDL-DHA nanoparticle selectively kills hepatoma cells and reduces growth of orthotopic liver tumors in rats. It induces tumor-specific necrosis by selectively disrupting redox balance within the cancer cell.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Japan 1 3%
Unknown 27 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 28%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 14%
Professor 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 9 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 21%
Unspecified 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Physics and Astronomy 2 7%
Other 5 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 100. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2017.
All research outputs
#137,171
of 12,422,413 outputs
Outputs from Gastroenterology
#78
of 8,061 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,788
of 271,239 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gastroenterology
#4
of 217 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,422,413 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,061 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,239 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 217 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.