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Avoidance of Fiber Is Associated With Greater Risk of Crohn’s Disease Flare in a 6-Month Period

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, January 2016
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58

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 2,081)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
Title
Avoidance of Fiber Is Associated With Greater Risk of Crohn’s Disease Flare in a 6-Month Period
Published in
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, January 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.cgh.2015.12.029
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brotherton, Carol S, Martin, Christopher A, Long, Millie D, Kappelman, Michael D, Sandler, Robert S, Carol S. Brotherton, Christopher A. Martin, Millie D. Long, Michael D. Kappelman, Robert S. Sandler

Abstract

Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) have been associated with an abnormal mucosal response to the gastrointestinal microbiota. Although dietary fiber affects the gastrointestinal microbiota, there is limited information on the role of fiber on IBD activity. We investigated factors associated with fiber consumption and whether it was associated with flares in patients with IBD. We collected a completed 26-item dietary survey from 1619 participants in the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners Internet cohort (Crohn's disease, 1130; ulcerative colitis/indeterminate colitis, 489). Eligible individuals were in remission based on disease activity index at baseline and completed a follow-up survey 6 months later. Fiber and whole grain consumption were categorized into quartiles and deciles. Disease flare at 6 months was defined as a disease activity index score exceeding remission cut-off values, and/or an IBD-related surgical procedure or hospitalization since baseline. Participants with longer duration of disease, past history of surgery and past IBD hospitalization ate less fiber. The risks for disease flare differed by disease type. Compared to those in the lowest quartile of fiber consumption, participants with Crohn's disease in the highest quartile were less likely to have a flare (adjusted odds ratios [OR], 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-0.90). Participants with Crohn's disease who reported that they did not avoid high fiber foods were ∼40% less likely to have a disease flare than those who avoided high fiber foods (adjusted OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.43-0.81). There was no association between fiber intake and flares in patients with ulcerative colitis (adjusted OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 0.92-3.60). Intake of dietary fiber is associated with reduced disease flares in patients with Crohn's disease, but not UC. Recommendations to limit dietary fiber should be reevaluated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 19%
Student > Master 6 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Unspecified 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Other 8 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 52%
Unspecified 4 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 10%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 58. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2017.
All research outputs
#214,310
of 11,382,748 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
#45
of 2,081 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,219
of 331,064 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
#3
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,382,748 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,081 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,064 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.