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Efficacy of curcumin, and a saffron/curcumin combination for the treatment of major depression: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Affective Disorders, January 2017
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825

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 8,637)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
77 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
268 tweeters
facebook
43 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors
video
4 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
84 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
258 Mendeley
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Title
Efficacy of curcumin, and a saffron/curcumin combination for the treatment of major depression: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study
Published in
Journal of Affective Disorders, January 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2016.09.047
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adrian L. Lopresti, Peter D. Drummond

Abstract

Several studies have supported the antidepressant effects of curcumin (from the spice turmeric) and saffron for people with major depressive disorder. However, these studies have been hampered by poor designs, small sample sizes, short treatment duration, and similar intervention dosages. Furthermore, the antidepressant effects of combined curcumin and saffron administration are unknown. In a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 123 individuals with major depressive disorder were allocated to one of four treatment conditions, comprising placebo, low-dose curcumin extract (250mg b.i.d.), high-dose curcumin extract (500mg b.i.d.), or combined low-dose curcumin extract plus saffron (15mg b.i.d.) for 12 weeks. The outcome measures were the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology self-rated version (IDS-SR30) and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The active drug treatments (combined) were associated with significantly greater improvements in depressive symptoms compared to placebo (p=.031), and superior improvements in STAI-state (p<.001) and STAI-trait scores (p=.001). Active drug treatments also had greater efficacy in people with atypical depression compared to the remainder of patients (response rates of 65% versus 35% respectively, p=.012). No differences were found between the differing doses of curcumin or the curcumin/saffron combination. Investigations with larger sample sizes are required to examine the efficacy of differing doses of curcumin and saffron/curcumin combination. Its effects in people with atypical depression also require examination in larger scale studies. Active drug treatments comprising differing doses of curcumin and combined curcumin/saffron were effective in reducing depressive and anxiolytic symptoms in people with major depressive disorder.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 268 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 258 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 256 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 60 23%
Researcher 25 10%
Other 24 9%
Student > Master 22 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 8%
Other 52 20%
Unknown 55 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 52 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 32 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 15 6%
Neuroscience 13 5%
Other 54 21%
Unknown 68 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 825. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2022.
All research outputs
#16,589
of 21,745,818 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Affective Disorders
#4
of 8,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#351
of 292,542 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Affective Disorders
#1
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,745,818 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,637 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,542 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.