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Comparison of adjuvant gemcitabine and capecitabine with gemcitabine monotherapy in patients with resected pancreatic cancer (ESPAC-4): a multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial

Overview of attention for article published in The Lancet, March 2017
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566

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
56 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
189 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
402 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
406 Mendeley
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Title
Comparison of adjuvant gemcitabine and capecitabine with gemcitabine monotherapy in patients with resected pancreatic cancer (ESPAC-4): a multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial
Published in
The Lancet, March 2017
DOI 10.1016/s0140-6736(16)32409-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

John P Neoptolemos, Daniel H Palmer, Paula Ghaneh, Eftychia E Psarelli, Juan W Valle, Christopher M Halloran, Olusola Faluyi, Derek A O'Reilly, David Cunningham, Jonathan Wadsley, Suzanne Darby, Tim Meyer, Roopinder Gillmore, Alan Anthoney, Pehr Lind, Bengt Glimelius, Stephen Falk, Jakob R Izbicki, Gary William Middleton, Sebastian Cummins, Paul J Ross, Harpreet Wasan, Alec McDonald, Tom Crosby, Yuk Ting Ma, Kinnari Patel, David Sherriff, Rubin Soomal, David Borg, Sharmila Sothi, Pascal Hammel, Thilo Hackert, Richard Jackson, Markus W Büchler

Abstract

The ESPAC-3 trial showed that adjuvant gemcitabine is the standard of care based on similar survival to and less toxicity than adjuvant 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Other clinical trials have shown better survival and tumour response with gemcitabine and capecitabine than with gemcitabine alone in advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. We aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine and capecitabine compared with gemcitabine monotherapy for resected pancreatic cancer. We did a phase 3, two-group, open-label, multicentre, randomised clinical trial at 92 hospitals in England, Scotland, Wales, Germany, France, and Sweden. Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older and had undergone complete macroscopic resection for ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (R0 or R1 resection). We randomly assigned patients (1:1) within 12 weeks of surgery to receive six cycles of either 1000 mg/m(2) gemcitabine alone administered once a week for three of every 4 weeks (one cycle) or with 1660 mg/m(2) oral capecitabine administered for 21 days followed by 7 days' rest (one cycle). Randomisation was based on a minimisation routine, and country was used as a stratification factor. The primary endpoint was overall survival, measured as the time from randomisation until death from any cause, and assessed in the intention-to-treat population. Toxicity was analysed in all patients who received trial treatment. This trial was registered with the EudraCT, number 2007-004299-38, and ISRCTN, number ISRCTN96397434. Of 732 patients enrolled, 730 were included in the final analysis. Of these, 366 were randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine and 364 to gemcitabine plus capecitabine. The Independent Data and Safety Monitoring Committee requested reporting of the results after there were 458 (95%) of a target of 480 deaths. The median overall survival for patients in the gemcitabine plus capecitabine group was 28·0 months (95% CI 23·5-31·5) compared with 25·5 months (22·7-27·9) in the gemcitabine group (hazard ratio 0·82 [95% CI 0·68-0·98], p=0·032). 608 grade 3-4 adverse events were reported by 226 of 359 patients in the gemcitabine plus capecitabine group compared with 481 grade 3-4 adverse events in 196 of 366 patients in the gemcitabine group. The adjuvant combination of gemcitabine and capecitabine should be the new standard of care following resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Cancer Research UK.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 189 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 406 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 397 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 67 17%
Unspecified 62 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 55 14%
Other 53 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 39 10%
Other 130 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 221 54%
Unspecified 89 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 29 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 2%
Other 34 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 566. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2019.
All research outputs
#12,500
of 13,410,167 outputs
Outputs from The Lancet
#298
of 31,830 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#699
of 345,670 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Lancet
#13
of 470 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,410,167 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 31,830 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 345,670 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 470 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.