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Malaria morbidity and mortality in Ebola-affected countries caused by decreased health-care capacity, and the potential effect of mitigation strategies: a modelling analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Lancet Infectious Diseases, July 2015
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345

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
195 tweeters
facebook
11 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
115 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
299 Mendeley
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Title
Malaria morbidity and mortality in Ebola-affected countries caused by decreased health-care capacity, and the potential effect of mitigation strategies: a modelling analysis
Published in
Lancet Infectious Diseases, July 2015
DOI 10.1016/s1473-3099(15)70124-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrick G T Walker, Michael T White, Jamie T Griffin, Alison Reynolds, Neil M Ferguson, Azra C Ghani

Abstract

The ongoing Ebola epidemic in parts of west Africa largely overwhelmed health-care systems in 2014, making adequate care for malaria impossible and threatening the gains in malaria control achieved over the past decade. We quantified this additional indirect burden of Ebola virus disease. We estimated the number of cases and deaths from malaria in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone from Demographic and Health Surveys data for malaria prevalence and coverage of malaria interventions before the Ebola outbreak. We then removed the effect of treatment and hospital care to estimate additional cases and deaths from malaria caused by reduced health-care capacity and potential disruption of delivery of insecticide-treated bednets. We modelled the potential effect of emergency mass drug administration in affected areas on malaria cases and health-care demand. If malaria care ceased as a result of the Ebola epidemic, untreated cases of malaria would have increased by 45% (95% credible interval 43-49) in Guinea, 88% (83-93) in Sierra Leone, and 140% (135-147) in Liberia in 2014. This increase is equivalent to 3·5 million (95% credible interval 2·6 million to 4·9 million) additional untreated cases, with 10 900 (5700-21 400) additional malaria-attributable deaths. Mass drug administration and distribution of insecticide-treated bednets timed to coincide with the 2015 malaria transmission season could largely mitigate the effect of Ebola virus disease on malaria. These findings suggest that untreated malaria cases as a result of reduced health-care capacity probably contributed substantially to the morbidity caused by the Ebola crisis. Mass drug administration can be an effective means to mitigate this burden and reduce the number of non-Ebola fever cases within health systems. UK Medical Research Council, UK Department for International Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 195 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 299 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Sierra Leone 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Unknown 291 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 57 19%
Researcher 56 19%
Student > Bachelor 38 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 36 12%
Student > Postgraduate 19 6%
Other 56 19%
Unknown 37 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 92 31%
Social Sciences 38 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 28 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 3%
Other 49 16%
Unknown 59 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 345. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2021.
All research outputs
#56,378
of 18,905,383 outputs
Outputs from Lancet Infectious Diseases
#176
of 4,856 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#739
of 239,135 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lancet Infectious Diseases
#3
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,905,383 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,856 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 74.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,135 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.