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Verbal memory and menopause

Overview of attention for article published in Maturitas, November 2015
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2

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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Verbal memory and menopause
Published in
Maturitas, November 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.07.023
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pauline M. Maki

Abstract

Midlife women frequently report memory problems during the menopausal transition. Recent studies validate those complaints by showing significant correlations between memory complaints and performance on validated memory tasks. Longitudinal studies demonstrate modest declines in verbal memory during the menopausal transition and a likely rebound during the postmenopausal stage. Clinical studies that examine changes in memory following hormonal withdrawal and add-back hormone therapy (HT) demonstrate that estradiol plays a critical role in memory. Although memory changes are frequently attributed to menopausal symptoms, studies show that the memory problems occur during the transition even after controlling for menopausal symptoms. It is well established that self-reported vasomotor symptoms (VMS) are unrelated to objective memory performance. However, emerging evidence suggests that objectively measured VMS significantly correlate with memory performance, brain activity during rest, and white matter hyperintensities. This evidence raises important questions about whether VMS and VMS treatments might affect memory during the menopausal transition. Unfortunately, there are no clinical trials to inform our understanding of how HT affects both memory and objectively measured VMS in women in whom HT is indicated for treatment of moderate to severe VMS. In clinical practice, it is helpful to normalize memory complaints, to note that evidence suggests that memory problems are temporary, and to counsel women with significant VMS that memory might improve with treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 25%
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 11 25%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 30%
Psychology 12 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 14%
Neuroscience 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2017.
All research outputs
#7,376,979
of 12,288,537 outputs
Outputs from Maturitas
#1,289
of 1,866 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,734
of 239,667 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maturitas
#33
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,288,537 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,866 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,667 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.