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Novelty, conditioning and attentional bias to sexual rewards

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Psychiatric Research, November 2015
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64

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 1,567)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
Title
Novelty, conditioning and attentional bias to sexual rewards
Published in
Journal of Psychiatric Research, November 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.10.017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Banca, Paula, Morris, Laurel S, Mitchell, Simon, Harrison, Neil A, Potenza, Marc N, Voon, Valerie, Paula Banca, Laurel S. Morris, Simon Mitchell, Neil A. Harrison, Marc N. Potenza, Valerie Voon

Abstract

The Internet provides a large source of novel and rewarding stimuli, particularly with respect to sexually explicit materials. Novelty-seeking and cue-conditioning are fundamental processes underlying preference and approach behaviors implicated in disorders of addiction. Here we examine these processes in individuals with compulsive sexual behaviors (CSB), hypothesizing a greater preference for sexual novelty and stimuli conditioned to sexual rewards relative to healthy volunteers. Twenty-two CSB males and forty age-matched male volunteers were tested in two separate behavioral tasks focusing on preferences for novelty and conditioned stimuli. Twenty subjects from each group were also assessed in a third conditioning and extinction task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. CSB was associated with enhanced novelty preference for sexual, as compared to control images, and a generalized preference for cues conditioned to sexual and monetary versus neutral outcomes compared to healthy volunteers. CSB individuals also had greater dorsal cingulate habituation to repeated sexual versus monetary images with the degree of habituation correlating with enhanced preference for sexual novelty. Approach behaviors to sexually conditioned cues dissociable from novelty preference were associated with an early attentional bias to sexual images. This study shows that CSB individuals have a dysfunctional enhanced preference for sexual novelty possibly mediated by greater cingulate habituation along with a generalized enhancement of conditioning to rewards. We further emphasize a dissociable role for cue-conditioning and novelty preference on the early attentional bias for sexual cues. These findings have wider relevance as the Internet provides a broad range of novel and potentially rewarding stimuli.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 39 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Researcher 7 16%
Other 2 5%
Other 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 22 51%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Neuroscience 3 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Other 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 64. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2017.
All research outputs
#146,756
of 8,414,405 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Psychiatric Research
#28
of 1,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,612
of 245,815 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Psychiatric Research
#2
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,414,405 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,567 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,815 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.