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Hot flushes among aging women: A 4-year follow-up study to a randomised controlled exercise trial

Overview of attention for article published in Maturitas, June 2016
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5

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
Hot flushes among aging women: A 4-year follow-up study to a randomised controlled exercise trial
Published in
Maturitas, June 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.03.010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kirsi Mansikkamäki, Clas-Håkan Nygård, Jani Raitanen, Katriina Kukkonen-Harjula, Eija Tomás, Reetta Rutanen, Riitta Luoto

Abstract

The aim of this follow-up study was to explore the long-term effects of a 6-month trial of exercise training on hot flushes. The follow-up was 4 years after the exercise intervention ended. A cohort study after a randomised controlled trial. Ninety-five of the 159 randomised women (60%) participated in anthropometric measurements and performed a 2-km walk test. Participants completed a questionnaire and kept a one-week diary on physical activity, menopause symptoms and sleep quality. The frequency of 24-h hot flushes was multiplied by severity and the total sum for one week was defined as the Hot Flush Score (HFScore). Multilevel mixed regression models were analysed to compare the exercise and control groups. Hot Flush Score (HFScore) as assessed with the one-week symptom diary. The women in the exercise group had a higher probability of improved HFScore, i.e. a decrease in HFScore points, adjusted for hormone therapy (OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.90-1.00) than women in the control group at the 4-year follow-up. After additional adjustment for sleep quality, the result approached statistical significance at HFScore≥13 with women in the exercise group. Women who had the least amount of hot flushes, HFScore<13, benefited most from exercise during the 4-year follow-up when compared with women in the control group. Women in the exercise group had positive effects on their HFScore 4 years after a 6-month exercise intervention.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 28%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 22%
Student > Master 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Professor 1 6%
Other 4 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 28%
Sports and Recreations 3 17%
Computer Science 1 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Other 3 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2018.
All research outputs
#3,232,697
of 12,875,491 outputs
Outputs from Maturitas
#584
of 1,950 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,799
of 264,297 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maturitas
#16
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,875,491 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,950 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,297 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.